Four Principles of Explainable Artificial Intelligence

 

Four Principles of Explainable Artificial Intelligence

 

August, 2020

 

Abstract

“We introduce four principles for explainable artificial intelligence (AI) that comprise the fundamental properties for explainable AI systems. They were developed to encompass the multidisciplinary nature of explainable AI, including the fields of computer science, engineering, and psychology. Because one size fits all explanations do not exist, different users will require different types of explanations. We present five categories of explanation and summarize theories of explainable AI. We give an overview of the algorithms in the field that cover the major classes of explainable algorithms. As a baseline comparison, we assess how well explanations provided by people follow our four principles. This assessment provides insights to the challenges of designing explainable AI systems.”

 

You can find original document below:

Click to access NIST%20Explainable%20AI%20Draft%20NISTIR8312%20%281%29.pdf

Personal Robots and Personal Data

 

Personal Robots and Personal Data

 

 

Gizem Gültekin Várkonyi

Assistant Coordinator, PhD Fellow

University of Szeged

Faculty of Law and Political Sciences

 

 

Abstract

In this blog post, I argue whether, and at what level, it is possible to exercise right to personal data protection in the era of Social Robots with Artificial Intelligence (hereafter, Social Robot). I analyze the concept of consent that was strengthened in European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). I basically reach to such a conclusion that, a Social Robot at personal usage challenges practicability of the GDPR. This conclusion derives from, first, Social Robot’s ability to collect vast amount of data naturally, e.g. via natural Human-Robot Interaction, or when it connects to Internet. Since a personal Social Robot’s life source, its blood, is personal data, it would be absurd for a user to not to give consent to get more personal services. In addition, it is well-known that most of the users do not read/listen consent texts, or do not understand even if they do so. Moreover, it is not easy to answer to the question of whether consent could be validly given for purposes that even the developer is not able to foresee (Unpredictable by Design). Finally, even if consent was validly given, it is not possible to make Social Robot to “forget” about the personal data in subject, in case when a particular personal data became an organic part of robot’s Neural Network. Otherwise, how consent could be withdrawn from a Social Robot should also be questioned.

 

For more details about author:

https://robotic.legal/author/ggvarkonyi/

Artificial intelligence: Anticipating Its Impact On Jobs To Ensure A Fair Transition

 

Artificial intelligence: Anticipating Its Impact On Jobs To Ensure A Fair Transition 

avrupa birliği ile ilgili görsel sonucu

European Economic and Social Committee

Rapporteur: Franca SALIS-MADINIER

19/09/2018

 

1.Conclusions and recommendations

1.1.Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics will expand and amplify the impact of the digitalisation of the economy on labour markets. Technological progress has always affected work and employment, requiring new forms of social and societal management. The EESC believes that technological development can contribute to economic and social progress; however, it feels that it would be a mistake to overlook its overall impact on society. In the world of work, AI will expand and amplify the scope of job automation. This is why the EESC would like to give its input to efforts to lay the groundwork for the social transformations which will go hand in hand with the rise of AI and robotics, by reinforcing and renewing the European social model.

1.2.The EESC flags up the potential of AI and its applications, particularly in the areas of healthcare, security in the transport and energy sectors, combating climate change and anticipating threats in the field of cybersecurity. The European Union, governments and civil society organisations have a key role to play when it comes to fully tapping the potential advantages of AI, particularly for people with disabilities or reduced mobility, the elderly and people with chronic health issues.

1.3.However, the EU has insufficient data on the digital economy and the resulting social transformation. The EESC recommends improving statistical tools and research, particularly on AI, the use of industrial and service robots, the Internet of Things and new economic models (the platform-based economy and new forms of employment and work).

1.4.The EESC calls on the European Commission to promote and support studies carried out by European sector-level social dialogue committees on the sector-specific impact of AI and robotics and, more broadly, of the digitalisation of the economy.

1.5.It is acknowledged that AI and robotics will displace and transform jobs, by eliminating some and creating others. Whatever the outcome, the EU must guarantee access to social protection for all workers, employees and self-employed or bogus self-employed persons, in line with the European Pillar of Social Rights.

 

You can find the link of the full document below:

https://www.eesc.europa.eu/en/our-work/opinions-information-reports/opinions/artificial-intelligence-anticipating-its-impact-jobs-ensure-fair-transition-own-initiative-opinion